Assembly instructions wind sensor Yachta

3D view (click on the image, wait for the download and move the object with the mouse)

The Yachta wind sensor is used to measure wind speed and wind direction on boats. It is installed on the mast and supplied with 12V. The data transmission of the NMEA0183 telegrams takes place wirelessly via WiFi. There is an access point and a small web server in the wind sensor. A mobile phone with a web browser is used as a display device for the measured values. The measurement data can also be displayed in other programs such as SignalK, AVnav, OpenCPN, Navionics or similar, which can process NMEA0183 data.

Copyright and Licenses

The copyright and the licenses must be observed when reproducing. The wind sensor can be recreated by anyone free of charge as long as there are no commercial intentions and money is earned with it. For commercial purposes, can Contact with open boat projects be included. We then clarify which possibilities exist for a commercial, non-exclusive exploitation.

If these instructions were helpful to you, we would be delighted if you would support us with a donation. This way we can publish other interesting projects. You also help ensure that this site continues to be available to the general public free of charge.

area License comment
documentation CC-BY-NC-SA All online and print documents
hardware CC-BY-NC-SA 2D, 3D CAD files
software GPL V3.0 Firmware, app

Difficulty level and time required

total
 
Level of difficulty 4
Time required [h] 2…3
Details
 
mechanics 2
electronics 6
software 2
network technology
4

The assembly instructions are aimed at those with technical skills. If you want to solder the electronics together, you should have experience in assembling SMD components. Without such experience, it is better to purchase a fully assembled board. Programming the ESP8266 microcontroller requires some experience in dealing with microcontrollers and programming adapters, but is not a major hurdle for beginners. If you want to modify the software yourself, you should be familiar with the programming language C and programming environments such as the Arduino IDE or PlatformIO. Since data is transferred via WiFi networks and TCP / IP, you should have knowledge of the configuration of WiFi routers and network technology.

Tools, aids and consumables

Tools use Source of supply
tweezers
Cutter knife / scalpel
Allen set
Open-end wrench set
Screwdriver set
Fine pliers
Electronics side cutter
Electronics soldering iron
Desoldering pump
USB cable (mini USB) programming
USB serial adapter (3.3V) programming
Aids
Digital multimeter Function test
Laptop / pc programming
mobile Function test with app
Oscilloscope (optional) Function test
Consumables
Tin solder D 1mm
Desoldering braid (optional)
Silicone oil / fine oil
Dupli-Color Aerosol Art, clear lacquer matt Protective varnish for plastic parts bauhaus.de
2K adhesive Weicon RK-1300 conrad.de
Alcohol 99% Drugstore, hardware store
Q tips Drug store
Rag

functionality

The Yachta wind sensor is an anemometer with a rotating bowl wheel. The wind direction is measured using the wind vane. The wind vane aligns itself according to the wind direction. On the underside of the axis there is a neodymium magnet whose magnetic field is measured without contact by a magnetic field sensor (AS5600), which is located on the green circuit board in the middle. The angles are subdivided into 4096 partial steps per 360 ° and transferred to the ESP8266 microcontroller via the I2C bus, resulting in an angular resolution of approx. 0.1 °. The wind speed is measured via the shell wheel, on the upper axis of which there is a ring with several small magnets. When rotating, the magnets move past a Hall sensor and trigger a digital switching signal that is evaluated by the ESP8266. The firmware of the wind sensor contains an access point and a small web server with which the measurement data can be transmitted via WiFi. With a mobile phone you can log into the WiFi network of the wind sensor and view the measurement data with a web browser. There is also an Android app with which the measurement data can be displayed. The wind sensor can also be connected via the TCP port 6666 with other evaluation and display software that is able to evaluate NMEA0183 data.

For mechanical details, you can explore the functional principle in the 3D view.

3D view (click on the image, wait for the download and move the object with the mouse)

Project documents

Helpful links

Important instructions

Before starting the project, take the time to read these guidelines to avoid the most common mistakes. First try to understand how the wind sensor is constructed and how it works before you start. Use the contact options if you have any questions or concerns. In this way you will be able to implement your project successfully.

PETG is an excellent filament for the 3D parts. It has a higher temperature stability than PLA and can be processed just as easily. Make sure not to use dark filaments, as the sun can heat the wind sensor very strongly and the plastic becomes soft. The dimensional stability is only given up to 70 ° C with PETG. White filaments have been found to be suitable. Black PETG filaments, on the other hand, are unsuitable. If you absolutely want to build a black wind sensor, then it is best to use ABS. However, printing is a little more complicated than with PETG and requires experience in handling ABS.

The printed parts of the wind sensor are not waterproof and have to be painted afterwards. Otherwise there is a risk of water entering the wind sensor and damaging the electronics. Any type of varnish cannot be used as the varnish, since ordinary varnish does not adhere to plastic parts. The paint listed in the component list is especially suitable for direct plastic coating without pretreatment. It is easy to work with and achieves good painting results. If you use alternative paints, check the suitability on test objects before painting the wind sensor.

Note that the adhesive used must have a certain residual elasticity in order to be able to compensate for the expansion or shrinkage of different components when the temperature changes. After all, temperature changes of approx. 100 ° C (-10… 90 ° C) can occur between summer and winter and this can break adhesive bonds.

If you have little experience with SMD electronics, buy an assembled and programmed circuit board. This saves you a lot of time and effort in troubleshooting.

If you want to program the electronics yourself, make sure to use a USB-serial converter with a 3.3V TTL signal level. Converters with 5V TTL level are unsuitable and can destroy the electronics. Basically, you should be careful with the electronics and not accidentally come into contact with metal parts. This can lead to short circuits and damage the electronics. Also, be careful not to be electrostatically charged. There is a particular danger in winter when the air humidity is low. You can discharge yourself on a metal water pipe or heating pipe before working on the electronics.

Schedule

The following component list refers to an assembly with a fully equipped and possibly also programmed board. If you want to assemble the board yourself, you will find a parts list for the electronic components in the GitLab repository.

The sources of supply listed in the component list may no longer be up-to-date. Then it is best to look for alternative procurement options on the Internet.

Mechanical assembly

Step by step description of the assembly with pictures and information on the necessary tools, aids and consumables

Cup wheel

Magnet holder and lower bearing

circuit board

Wind vane and substructure

Standpipe and base

Painting

software

Description of how to prepare the development environment for compiling the source code and how to program the binary file in the hardware. Pictures or circuit diagram for the programming hardware.

Firmware installation

The firmware can be installed on the ESP12-E before soldering in using a programming adapter or on the fully equipped circuit board.

Fig: ESP8266 programming adapter for external programming

Fig: Programming adapter for programming on the circuit board

When using a programming adapter for programming on the circuit board, make sure that the signal levels for TX and RX support 3.3V TTL levels. 5.0V TTL levels cannot be used as this can damage the ESP12-E. The programming adapter is to be connected as shown in the picture. You have to make sure that RX is connected to TX and TX to RX. Otherwise you will not be able to carry out any other program transfer.

Fig: programming circuit

Programming instructions

  1. Build the programming circuit together
  2. Connect PRG and GND
  3. Connect the USB programming adapter to the laptop or PC
  4. Connect the 9V battery block
  5. Programming software NodeMCU Flasher start on laptop or PC and load firmware
  6. Start the programming process
  7. If programming is successful, disconnect USB and switch off 9V
  8. Separate PRG and GND
  9. Disconnect the programming circuit from the circuit board
  10. Switch on 12V and check firmware via WiFi connection

NodeMCU Flasher

The easy-to-use Windows tool NodeMCU Flasher be used. The EXE file can be started directly without any special installation. The tool can be used for both external and in-circuit programming. The first thing to do is take Advanced made the following settings.

After that, under Config the Current firmware file firmware_Vx.xx.wsb selected.

You open up to flash surgery and selects the corresponding interface to which the adapter is connected. Then you press Flash and wait until the firmware is loaded.

The progress of the transfer is displayed during the flashing.

If the firmware has been loaded successfully, the following screen is shown.

After the transfer, the programming tool can be closed and the adapter removed.

The wind sensor needs a reboot to start the new firmware. After the restart, the wind sensor provides a WiFi network with the name NoWa, into which you can log in 30 s after the restart with a mobile phone and the password 12345678. The blue LED then goes out briefly 3 times when the web server is ready. If you then call up the website of the wind sensor with the Android app (http://192.168.4.1), the following should be seen. If the access data of an access point is entered under WLAN client SSID and WLAN client password, the wind sensor will log into this WiFi network. The blue LED then goes out as an indication of a successful connection. If measurement data are called up via port 6666 by a program such as OpenCPN or similar, the blue LED always flashes briefly when a telegram is transmitted.

The last thing that needs to be done in the firmware is the correct type of wind sensor Yachta must be selected in the configuration so that the data is displayed correctly.

Fig: Device Settings for Yachta

Fig: Measured values for Yachta

 

Function test

Step by step description of the function test with measurement results and images. Describe how, for example, the device must be calibrated.

Troubleshooting

Description of typical assembly errors and their effects and how they can be rectified

Technical specifications

description Value / range of values comment
Measurement data
Wind speed 0 ... 40 m / s, 0 ... 78 kn
Start speed 1 m / s
Wind direction 0… 360 °
Wind direction resolution 0.1 °
Function type magnetic
calibration Slope, offset
Environmental conditions
Ambient temperature 0 ... 60 ° C
Storage temperature -10 ... 80 ° C
humidity 0…100 %
Weight class IP63, IPX3 protected against spray water
Power supply
Supply voltage 7… 30V reverse polarity protected
Power consumption 0.5W typical
Data transfer
Network type WiFi 11 bgn 2.4 GHz
Data rate 3 Mbit / s
Range approx. 50 m in the free field
AccessPoint Yes max. 3 clients
Web server yes, port 80 Operating pages
JSON data server yes, port 80 Control data
TCP data server yes, port 6666 NMEA0183 data stream
Serial interface yes, 3.3V level NMEA0183, debug data, parameterizable
MDNS Yes can be switched off
NMEA0183 Sentences
MWV Wind data
VWR Wind data
VPW Performance data
INF Custom code
Supported software
Linux AVnav, OpenPlotter, OpenCPN
Android Wind sensor app, AVnav, OpenCPN, Navionics, WinGPS pro
Windows WinGPS
iOS NMEAremote, Navionics
Dimensions
Dimensions 175 x 120 x 150 mm without pipe and foot
weight 150 g with pipe and foot
materials
plastic PETG: housing parts painted
Metals Alu: holding tube anodized
V2A: tip, screws, nuts
miscellaneous
CE no
UL no
guarantee no
Licenses CC-BY-NC-SA Hardware, documentation
GPL 3.0 software

Opinions and tips

We hope that these instructions have helped you to implement the project successfully. Your opinions and tips are important to us. Please let us know whether you have come to terms with the instructions, have had difficulties or have tips on where we should improve the documentation. The best way to do this is to use our contact form. In this way we can enable a high quality of the replication instructions and a successful project implementation.

Ventus W132 - conversion to NMEA2000 wind sensor

 

Fig .: Exterior view

  • NMEA0183 and NMEA2000
  • Only three other parts (ESP32, roll pin, CAN BUS) are required
  • Angular resolution in 0.1 ° steps
  • Data can be displayed in the browser (in AP mode even without an external network)
  • Code fully commented on GitHub

This project describes the conversion of the replacement anemometer Ventus W132 with minimal material expenditure. The entire project, including the purchase of the W132, can be implemented for less than € 50.

The detailed documentation for the conversion as well as the commented software can be found on GitHub: https://github.com/jukolein/W132.

The corresponding thread in the SegelForum can be found here: https://www.segeln-forum.de/board194-boot-technik/board195-open-boat-projects-org/81141-boots-windsensor-ventus-w132-f%C3%BCr-50-euro/.

Since existing hardware is modified here, many critical work steps such as printing the housing or post-processing for weather resistance are no longer necessary.

The wind speed is measured by a Hall sensor, the direction by a magnetic rotation sensor. This enables extremely precise information, especially with regard to the wind direction.

The size of the housing allows the use of an ESP32, which enables the creation and transmission not only of NMEA0183 datagrams via WiFi, but also, for the first time, of NMEA2000 data.

In addition, the data can be displayed graphically in the browser. The sensor can be calibrated or the transmission of NMEA2000 data activated / deactivated via a settings page.

A software update via the network is also possible.

 

Fig .: Circuit diagram

 

Fig .: List of materials

 

Fig .: Settings

Weather data via SMS and satellite

Philippe from France presented us with an interesting project on how, as a blue-water sailor, you can use a cheap satellite communication device to access weather data at any point on earth via SMS. We want to introduce it here. Anyone traveling far from the mainland with their boat needs reliable weather data every day for route planning. The weather data can be obtained in different ways:

  • Internet connection via satellite
  • Short wave Pactor connection to the mainland
  • Short wave weather fax
  • Long wave short form weather data

In the age of ubiquitous Internet access, however, there is a high cost for a satellite system with a corresponding data throughput. Both the hardware and the data volume are expensive. Shortwave radios are just as expensive as satellite systems and require a lot of electricity. What they all have in common is that they need a lot of space and energy to transmit the weather data.

Fig. Shortwave weather data

Philippe found a cheap and easy way to get weather data with a cheap satellite communication device. Satellite communication devices like that InReach mini  from Garmin are small satellite cell phones with limited functionality with which no voice operation is possible, but low-priority, slow data exchange is possible. Such a device is available from around 350 euros. It can be used to send bidirectional short messages such as SMS, mail. In addition to transmitting the GPS position as position tracking, the small device can also be used to receive simple weather data and as an SOS emergency call transmitter. Due to the limited and simple functionality, inexpensive data volumes are offered for the device with a monthly fee of approx. 60 euros.

Fig. InReach mini satellite communication device

The basic idea of obtaining weather data is to send an SMS with the GPS position and the desired geographic area of the weather data to a land station, which then sends back the desired current weather data or weather forecast data via SMS in response. A normal mobile phone functions as a land station, which can respond to SMS messages with the help of a server app and obtain weather data from the Internet. Incoming SMS with inquiries are processed by the server and the necessary weather data is provided stormglass.io downloaded and broken down into individual SMS messages and sent back to the requesting mobile phone. Since an SMS message can only transmit 160 characters, the request data and response data must be prepared in a correspondingly compact manner. To this end, Philippe has written three apps that enable the coding and decoding of SMS messages as well as a server application for providing the weather data. The current GPS location, the sea area and the type of display in the form of a distance factor are transmitted as query data. The display format of the weather data can be changed with the distance factor. Either centered on the location or looking ahead in the direction of travel.

Fig.Function of the distance factor (left: 0.0, middle: 0.5, right: 1.0)

With the coding app, the request data Base64 encoded and output in the form of a text string that can be transferred to the InReach mini satellite communication device. There is another app for the InReach mini that can be used to operate the device and transmit the SMS. After a certain response time from the satellite system, which can take between 5 and 20 minutes, you will receive a certain number of Base64-coded SMS replies that can be converted again with the decoding app.

  

Fig. Encoding and decoding app

Fig. Non-decoded SMS replies for several data points

The SMS replies contain the following information in the form of KML data:

  • Time stamp ( YYYY-MM-DD HH: mm UTC)
  • Air pressure in hPa
  • Visibility in nautical miles
  • Cloud cover in 1/8 (0 = clear sky, 8 = overcast sky)
  • Air temperature in degrees Celsius
  • Direction (wind out in °) and wind speed with gusts in kt
  • Direction (incoming current in °) and speed of the ocean current in kt
  • Wave direction and swell in degrees (starting in °)
  • Wave height (measured between ridge and valley) in meters
  • Wave period (number of seconds separating the passage of 2 consecutive peaks) in seconds

The KML data can then be inserted and visualized in any program such as Google Maps, Google Earth or similar. There are also free applications for Android and iOS such as Guru Maps with which the weather data can also be displayed in offline maps.

Fig. Decoded KML data

Fig.Guru Maps

Fig. Information of the data point

summary

With the system presented by Philippe, weather data can be received via satellite at low cost. The equipment consists of a small satellite communication device and a few apps as well as a cell phone with internet access, which serves as a land station for providing the weather data. The apps handle both the coding and decoding of the data and enables the weather data to be displayed in an offline map on a mobile phone or tablet. At this point, however, it should be mentioned that no extensive, large-scale and detailed weather data can be received as with official weather maps. Each SMS reply then corresponds to exactly one data point in the weather map. It makes sense to only call up a small amount of weather data that covers the immediate area in which you are moving with your boat. The presented system can be used well on small boats where little space is available. In addition to the SOS emergency call function, the InReach mini can also be used for other types of communication or tracking and is a useful addition to the equipment on board. Because the server app runs on your own mobile phone on land, you have the entire system in your hand and are not dependent on expensive third-party service providers.

If you want, you can query the weather data with a normal cell phone and thus test the entire functionality without a satellite communication device. To do this, you send an SMS to the mobile phone with the server app and receive the weather data as a response.

That's a very, very cool idea…. Have fun testing.

link

Website: https://mikeno.fr/meteo-sms-en.html

Source code and app for Android

Source code for iOS

 

Yachta wind sensor

Fig: Yachta wind sensor

The Yachta wind sensor is a further development of a wind sensor from the Yachta user at bei Thingiverse was presented. The technical principle of operation is based on one Hall sensor for measuring wind speed and on one magnetic rotation sensor for measuring the wind direction. Udo from the german sailing forum took up the idea and made some improvements to the wind sensor. The shell wheel of the wind turbine was dismantled into several parts, so that 3D printing is easier. In addition, he has revised the electronics. Another magnetic rotation sensor has been selected that is easier to obtain. The one that is popular with hobbyists as an evaluation and communication unit ESP-12E used. In addition to the Yachta wind sensor, Udo has also redesigned another wind sensor and further improved some points in the mechanical structure. The objective of Udo's constructions was that the wind sensors could be easily reproduced without the need for special metal parts. As a hobbyist, you can obtain all the necessary parts from specialist retailers and hardware stores.

Both Udo and Jukolein have written firmware for the Yachta wind sensor that has different functionalities. With both firmware, the measurement data can be saved as NMEA0183 telegrams transmitted via WiFi and processed in appropriate software such as AVnav, OpenCPN. With the firmware from Jukolein, the measurement data can also be displayed on a website. Norbert's firmware for the WiFi 1000 wind sensor can also be used for the Yachta wind sensor. This firmware is universal and supports other commercial and non-commercial wind sensors as well. In terms of functionality, this firmware offers the greatest possibilities and also has a web interface for visualization and operation.

Fig: Board wind sensor Yachta

Fig: Built-in circuit board

Udo's circuit board was revised again by Norbert and improved in some points. The board can be easily accessed via the internet Aisler can be obtained in small numbers. All the necessary manufacturing data are stored at Aisler. The ordering process is very easy.

This wind sensor clearly illustrates the possibilities that DIY projects with open software and open hardware offer. Without the openness, further development and improvement by different people would hardly have been possible.

Properties of the Yachta wind sensor

  • Measurement of wind speed 0… 75 kn and wind direction 0… 360 °
  • Angular resolution 0.1 °
  • Robust mechanics (3 ball bearings)
  • Without special metal parts
  • All components can be found in specialist shops and hardware stores
  • Simple 3D parts
  • Weight approx 210g
  • Weatherproof and UV-stable
  • No cables required for sensor signals
  • Digital signal transmission via WiFi
  • Supply voltage 6… 25V
  • Current consumption 30mA @ 12V (0.36W)
  • 12V supply possible via toplight
  • ESP8266 for WiFi and data transfer
  • Update rate 1 reading per second
  • No built-in instrument necessary
  • Visualization in OpenPlotter on a laptop, mobile phone or tablet
  • Web interface for operation
  • No extra software necessary (the display is the display)
  • Supports the NMEA 0183 protocol
  • Firmware update possible via internet

Firmware properties

Udo firmware

  • Web configuration for IP settings port 80
  • UDP port 2948
  • UDP NMEA0183 telegram MWV

Jukolein firmware

  • Web configuration and graphic visualization
  • Web server port 80
  • UDP port 8080
  • TCP port 8080
  • UDP / TCP NMEA0183 telegram MWV
  • Firmware update OTA via Arduino IDE

Wifi 1000 firmware

  • Web configuration and graphic visualization
  • Web server port 80
  • TCP port 6666
  • TCP NMEA0183 telegrams MWV, VWR, VPW
  • TCP NMEA0183 customer-specific telegrams INF, WST, WSE
  • JSON interface via http://192.168.4.1/json
  • Firmware update via internet via GitLab
  • Android app

use

The Yachta wind sensor works well in combination with a Raspberry Pi with, for example, OpenPlotter or AVnav to be used. The Raspberry Pi then provides an access point in the WiFi network. The wind sensor connects to the WiFi network and transmits the NMEA0183 data telegrams to the Raspberry Pi. All end devices also connect to the WiFi network and can graphically display the measurement data processed by OpenPlotter or AVnav.

Fig: Connection options

Direct communication from the mobile phone with the wind sensor is also possible if no measurement data processing software is used. A small web server is implemented in the firmware of the wind sensor, which can display the measurement data directly. However, the performance is somewhat lower than with a Raspberry Pi. It makes sense to only connect 2… 3 end devices to the wind sensor at the same time and display data. There is also an Android web app that can be used to display the measurement data. The WebApp is a frameless web browser that displays the content of the website and at the same time ensures that the screen of the mobile phone does not switch off automatically as long as the app is running.

Replica

A Repository at GitLab created. All manufacturing documents can be found there. The mechanical assembly instructions consist of a series of pictures showing the individual steps of assembly. It's easiest if you look at that complete repositories as zip files download The board can be ordered from any board manufacturer with the help of the Gerber data. The easiest way to order circuit boards is via Aisler, since all Gerber data is already stored there. A small series of assembled and programmed boards was launched. If you are interested, you can leave a message here using the contact form.

Caution: If you assemble the board yourself, you should make sure that the output voltage of the DC / DC converter is set to 3.3V before soldering. Otherwise the ESP-12E will be destroyed by overvoltage.

Firmware installation

The firmware can be installed on the ESP12-E before soldering in using a programming adapter or on the fully equipped circuit board.

Fig: ESP8266 programming adapter for external programming

Fig: Programming adapter for programming on the circuit board

When using a programming adapter for programming on the circuit board, make sure that the signal levels for TX and RX support 3.3V TTL levels. 5.0V TTL levels cannot be used as this can damage the ESP12-E. The programming adapter is to be connected as shown in the picture. You have to make sure that RX is connected to TX and TX to RX. Otherwise you will not be able to carry out any other program transfer.

Fig: programming circuit

Programming instructions

  1. Build the programming circuit together
  2. Connect PRG and GND
  3. Connect the USB programming adapter to the laptop or PC
  4. Connect the 9V battery block
  5. Programming software NodeMCU Flasher start on laptop or PC and load firmware
  6. Start the programming process
  7. If programming is successful, disconnect USB and switch off 9V
  8. Separate PRG and GND
  9. Disconnect the programming circuit from the circuit board
  10. Switch on 12V and check firmware via WiFi connection

NodeMCU Flasher

The easy-to-use Windows tool NodeMCU Flasher be used. The EXE file can be started directly without any special installation. The tool can be used for both external and in-circuit programming. The first thing to do is take Advanced made the following settings.

After that, under Config the current firmware file firmware_Vx.xx.wsb selected.

You open up to flash surgery and selects the corresponding interface to which the adapter is connected. Then you press Flash and wait until the firmware is loaded.

The progress of the transfer is displayed during the flashing.

If the firmware has been loaded successfully, the following screen is shown.

After the transfer, the programming tool can be closed and the adapter removed.

The wind sensor needs a reboot to start the new firmware. After the restart, the wind sensor provides a WiFi network with the name NoWa, into which you can log in 30 s after the restart with a mobile phone and the password 12345678. The blue LED then goes out briefly 3 times when the web server is ready. If you then call up the website of the wind sensor with the Android app (http://192.168.4.1), you should see the following. If the access data of an access point is entered under WLAN client SSID and WLAN client password, the wind sensor will log into this WiFi network. The blue LED then goes out as an indication of a successful connection. If measurement data are called up via port 6666 by a program such as OpenCPN or similar, the blue LED always flashes briefly when a telegram is transmitted.

The last thing that needs to be done in the firmware is the correct type of wind sensor Yachta must be selected in the configuration so that the data is displayed correctly.

Fig: Device Settings for Yachta

Fig: Measured values for Yachta

 

Universal wind sensor firmware

The universal wind sensor firmware supports various wind sensors. It is based on the firmware for DIY wind sensor WiFi 1000 and has been expanded accordingly to include further types of wind sensors. Different types of sensors, such as analog, magnetic and digital, can be connected. The corresponding wind sensor is selected in the firmware. No further settings need to be made. With the support of commercial sensors, their product properties can be improved, since in addition to wired data transmission, transmission via WiFi is also possible.

The following DIY wind sensors are currently supported:

WiFi 1000 (ESP8266, 2x Hall sensor)
Yachta V1.0 (ESP8266, 1x Hall sensor, 1x AS5600 magnetic field rotation sensor)
Jukolein V1.0 (ESP8266, 1x Hall sensor, 1x AS5600 magnetic field rotation sensor)
Ventus W132 (with changes to the wind sensor, external board, ESP8266, 1x reed switch, 1x AS5600 magnetic field rotation sensor, 1x BME280 environmental sensor)

The following commercial wind sensors are to be added in the future:

Davis Vintage Pro 2 (no changes to the wind sensor, external board, ESP32, 1x analog, 1x hall sensor)
NASA / Clipper wind sensor (new PCB board in the wind sensor, ESP8266, 1x Hall sensor, 1x AS5600 magnetic field rotation sensor)

Connection scheme

Fig: Wemos D1 mini

Input assignment

Sensor type Wind speed Wind direction temperature
WiFi 1000 GPIO5 Hall sensor GPIO4 Hall sensor GPIO12 (1Wire) optional
Yachta V1.0 GPIO2 Hall sensor GPIO5 (SCL) AS5600*

GPIO4 (SDA) AS5600*

GPIO12 (1Wire)
Jukolein V1.0 GPIO2 Hall sensor GPIO5 (SCL) AS5600*

GPIO4 (SDA) AS5600*

GPIO12 (1Wire)
Davis Vintage Pro 2 GPIO7 Hall sensor A0 (Analogue) GPIO12 (1Wire) optional
Ventus W132 GPIO14 Reed switch*** GPIO5 (SCL) AS5600* , BME280**

GPIO4 (SDA) AS5600* , BME280**

GPIO12 (1Wire) optional
NASA / Clipper V1.0 GPIO7 Hall sensor GPIO5 (SCL) AS5600*

GPIO4 (SDA) AS5600*

GPIO12 (1Wire) optional

Annotation: *AS5600 I2C address 0x36, ** BME280 I2C address 0x76, ***Pullup 10k and 100n interference suppression capacitor

Remote control for anchor winch

Fig: radio remote control

It is often the case that the anchor winch can only be operated via built-in switches and the switches are attached in such a way that one cannot properly see the anchor fall or the catching up. The use of an additional remote control is much more practical. This means that the anchor winch can be operated from anywhere and is no longer subject to any restrictions. This is a great advantage, especially for single-handed sailors.

The solution is Retrofit kits which can be purchased in different versions on the Internet. The remote control should have at least two independent switching channels and enable inching operation. It should be ensured that the remote control receiver unit has potential-free switching contacts (relay). The remote control can be added to the existing switches by simply connecting the switching contacts in parallel.

Features of the remote control

  • 433 MHz radio technology
  • 2-channel (up / down)
  • Inching operation
  • Range approx. 30 m
  • Radio transmitter with battery (12V, not waterproof)
  • 2 potential-free switching contacts as output
  • Power supply 12… 24V
  • Consumption of the receiver unit approx. 50 mA at 12V

Fig: Terminal assignment of the receiver unit

Remote control for Raymarine Evo Pilot

Fig: Remote control for Raymarine Evo Pilot

The user matztam from the sailing forum has presented a remote control for the Raymarine Evo Pilot. The remote control transmits on 433 MHz and converts the received signals into the NMEA2000 network. In this way, the settings for the Raymarine autopilot can be made very conveniently. The remote control consists of two parts. One from the hand-held control unit and the other from a QIACHIP RX480E / TX118SA radio receiver. The housing of the remote control is made of 3D printed parts. The same goes for the rubberized buttons. The front and back were lasered out of Plexiglas plates. An Arduino STM32F103 decodes the received radio signals and then feeds them into the NMEA2000 network. The remote control has a contactlessly chargeable battery (Qi) just like cell phones can be charged.

At Github you can find all the documents you need to replicate the remote control.

https://github.com/matztam/raymarine-evo-pilot-remote

The remote control has the following features:

  • Radio technology 433 MHz
  • Keys: +1, -1, +10, -10, Stand By, Auto, Wind, Track
  • LiPo battery
  • Qi charging technology (contactless)
  • Receiving unit
    • Arduino STM32F103
    • NMEA2000
    • Bus connector

Fig: Housing stack

Fig: Rubber buttons 3D printed

Fig: Housing intermediate parts

Fig: Circuit board with buttons

Fig: Qi charging electronics

RS422 converter for Clipper wind instruments

Fig .: Clipper wind instrument

Some older models of the Clipper wind instruments have a 5-pin DIN socket on the back for a daughter display. The wind data are also output as NMEA0183 via this DIN socket. Unfortunately, the signals do not correspond to the RS422 standard and cannot be used meaningfully any longer. The output signal used is 5V TTL levels with a very low current carrying capacity. These signals cannot be processed directly by RS422. With a small circuit as a level adapter, a differential signal according to the RS422 standard can be generated from the unipolar 5V TTL transmission signal.

Fig .: RS422 converter for Clipper Wind V1.0 with DIN sockets

Fig .: Clipper Wind V1.0 with DIN socket (bottom right)

The circuit consists of a voltage converter LM7805 (IC2) for a 5V power supply for IC1 and two comparators located in an LM358N (IC1). The supply voltage for the circuit is taken from the NASA / Clipper wind instrument (pin 2 and 4). The 5V TTL data signal T + from pin 3 is fed to the comparator IC1A and compared with a 1V reference signal that is generated via the voltage divider R6 and R7. Signals from T + that are greater than 1V are recognized as a high signal and a 5V signal is output at A +, which can drive approx. 20mA to the load. This amplified signal is fed to the second comparator IC1B, which outputs an inverted signal at A-, which can also drive approx. 20mA to the load. This generates the two differential signals A + and A- for RS422.

The newer version V2.0 from Clipper Wind no longer has a DIN socket and the pin assignment is slightly different. The upper circuit can also be used for the newer version.

Fig .: NMEA0183 connections for Clipper Wind V2.0

The circuit can be built on a breadboard and housed in a small housing. With the circuit, both the main display and the subsidiary display can be operated at the same time, and the transmitted signals can be fed into SignalK via an RS422-USB converter, for example.

A somewhat simpler circuit for an RS232 interface can also be found on the Internet. Depending on the RS232-USB converter used, the circuit may or may not work. Safe functioning is not always given and depends on the RS232 chip used, as some chips can also process signals that are not RS232 compliant. The disadvantage of this simple circuit, however, is that a daughter display cannot be operated at the same time, since the output driver in the main unit does not supply enough power.

Here is another interesting project where the NMEA0183 telegrams can be used via WiFi with a Wemos D1 mini:

https://hackaday.io/project/12986-nasa-wind-decoder

 

Weather fax with world receiver

Jürgen has in Sailing forum presented a weather fax receiver that I would like to introduce here. A simple world receiver and the weather fax app are used to receive weather faxes HF WEATHER FAX used. We recommend the following two world receivers from Sony, which have proven themselves:

  • ICF-2001D
  • ICF-SW7600

Fig .: ICF-2001D

Depending on the area of travel, the corresponding shortwave transmission frequency is set in the world receiver. With the app, the digitally coded broadcast is received via the microphone and displayed accordingly as an image. The coded transmission is a low-frequency signal (LF signal) in the frequency range of the human hearing, which is reminiscent of the old analog modem days. Here is an example of how that sounds:

Weather fax audio example

Fig .: Weather fax app

The paid Android weather fax app HF WEATHER FAX takes care of the following:

  • Manual or auto mode
  • Spectrum analyzer for easy frequency tuning and reception
  • Automatic start and end tone detection (in auto mode)
  • Synchronization at the beginning of the transmission (in auto mode)
  • Automatic storage of weather images on SD card (in auto mode)
  • Automatic correction functions in the event of malfunctions
  • Auto scroll mode
  • Picture zoom function
  • Black and white image with threshold setting
  • Storage of historical weather faxes
  • Timer function for automatic recording

Basically, the app takes away important functions of the reception settings and thus simplifies operation. The weather faxes are sent out over different frequencies and at fixed times, depending on the region. Below is a global overview:

Frequency and transmission plan for weather faxes

DWD weather fax broadcast schedule

 

Ultrasonic tank sensor with SensESP

Fig .: Ultrasonic level sensor

https://www.segeln-forum.de/board194-boot-technik/board195-open-boat-projects-org/p2301715-ber%C3%BChrungsloses-messen-von-tankinhalten/#post2301715

 

Fred has another implementation of an ultrasonic tank sensor with him SensESP  and a Wemos D1 mini. The Ultrasonic sensor DS1603L detects liquid levels in a tank and provides the corresponding measured values via SensESP via WiFi SignalK. SensESP is a software framework for the Arduino IDE with which different sensors can be easily integrated into SignalK. The special thing about SensESP is that sensors can be docked in SignalK without a network configuration. A SignalK server is automatically recognized by SensESP and the network configuration for data transmission via WiFi is carried out independently. The level can be visualized in SignalK.

Due to the properties of the sensor, there is no need to drill a hole in the tank, which is why this sensor can be used as a retrofit solution for existing tanks without a level indicator. Thanks to the WLAN connection, no further data cables need to be laid; a 12V supply near the tank to which the microcontroller can be connected is sufficient. The Wemos D1 mini pro module is a microcontroller based on the ESP 8266 with built-in WLAN module. The ultrasonic sensor is connected to the microcontroller. The ultrasonic sensor is glued to the outside of the tank bottom. The liquid level in the tank can then be recorded.

Caution: The sensor must be attached to the bottom of the tank, so it must "ping" from bottom to top in order to record the liquid level. "Pinging" from top to bottom does not work.

The software for the level sensor can be found here: https://github.com/frewie/UltrasonicTankSensor

We have a similar project under DIY ultrasonic level measurement to find. However, it uses its own software that can transmit NMEA0183 data sets via WiFi.

Fig .: Waterproof housing for the level sensor